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August 30, 2016

Flash Fiction Challenge – Behold the Idiomatic

Filed under: flash fiction challenge — Tags: , , — Eva Therese @ 11:19 am

Another Flash Fiction Challenge from the great bearded Chuck Wendig. This time based on a randomly generated idiom-mashup. I had to click a few times, before getting “Hindsight is a shepherd’s warning” which sounds almost reasonable, if you think about it, but not too hard.


Mary had an mental picture of the kind of signs they had at some workplaces, saying how many days it had been since the last accident, except than in her mind, it said “death” rather than “accident” and right now the number was being changed from 71 to 0.

She had learned to keep the girls safe, mostly, but it had been learning by trial and error. The kind of errors that had cost lives in the beginning. Water needs to be boiled, always. Some poisonous plants look an awful lot like eatable ones. We don’t have any kind of antibiotics so even relatively small wounds can get dangerously infected. The learning curve had been steep. It would have been easier if Sally had also been here, but when one of the girls had fallen into a river, Sally had jumped in to save her and they had both been swept away by the current, never to be seen again. At least not by Mary.

She blinked, realized that she had been distracted and looked down at the girl in front of her, Melanie, who was twisting and turning, face sweaty, teeth clenched like she was trying to hold in the moans, that escaped her once in a while. Mary thought of the time she’d had appendicitis. She had felt just like the girl looked. She needed to go a hospital. Might as well say she needed to go to the moon.

There were no hospitals, no nothing. They listened to the radio for news, but only about once a week to save on the batteries. There was nothing but white noise and once in a while a message on automated repeat about how citizens should barricade themselves in their homes and wait for the army to arrive. But Mary and the girls had no homes but their tents and no choice but to keep moving, picking up supplies along the way.

It had only been supposed to be a weekend, an extended picnic, really. A camp away from camp. Mary had never been meant to have the responsibility to keep them alive for month after month, but she had tried her best. That’s what she tried to tell herself, but when she closed her eyes at night she was haunted by the images of the dead girls’ faces.

Melanie shuddered and took a few deep, rasping breaths. Mary reached out and took her hand. It was clammy and limp. She squeezed it anyway.

How could she protect them from something like this? Until now they had been trying to simply survive until the world somehow returned to some semblance of normalcy. They had gone through one day after another, gathering food and firewood and scavenging a bit from abandoned cabins. The last chocolate bar had been more than two months ago and it had been divided into fourteen tiny pieces, but some of the girls still spoke of it with longing in their voices.

Mary knew they would be in trouble when winter started to set in, but she had told herself that they would cross that bridge when they came to it. Or rather, she had secretly hoped that this wouldn’t last until then.

Now winter seemed to loom in front of her, no longer a distant possibility but a deadly certainty.

She became aware of whispering voices from outside the tent, so she let go of Melanie’s hand, opened the flap and climbed outside on legs that were stiff from kneeling so long.

Two of the girls let go of each other’s hand with guilty expression, while two others held on to each other, their expressions defiant. When you thought about it, it made absolute sense that of course some of the girls would come together like that. Mary felt no anger or shock at the idea. She didn’t even remember why she would once have felt like that. She was just relieved that they were in no risk for unwanted pregnancies.

“How is Melanie?” asked Rose, a small, red-haired girl.

“Not good. I doubt if she’ll make it through the night.” There was no point in lying.

The words were met with mostly a somber silence, although a few of Melanie’s friends started to sob quietly.

“It’s a punishment,” said one of the other girls, Hester, quietly. “For being what we are. God is punishing us and everyone around …”

“Don’t talk like that.” Mary’s words came out harsher than she had intended. “You’re not being punished. No-one is punishing us. There’s … there’s no-one to punish us. No-one judging us.”

They all looked at her, stunned.

She continued. “But this also means that there’s no-one to save us. Until the world rights itself, it’s just us, trying to stay alive. Together.”

A few hesitant nods.

”Go to bed. I’ll keep watch over Melanie.” She turned and was climbing back into the tent, when she was suddenly aware of a shift in the wind. It had changed direction or maybe simply picked up. It brought with it a smell of frost.

She knelt down in the twilight of the tent and looked at Melanie, slipping away with each moment.

There is no-one, Mary thought. No-one who watches us, no-one to watch over us. There’s just us, doing whatever we can to survive.

Melanie might die in a few hours or she might live for a few days. She might even recover completely. But if frost was coming, they didn’t have a few days and they certainly didn’t have however long it would take for her to be back on her feet. They needed to get moving and find a shelter for the winter.

They are children, thought Mary. There’s no-one watching over them but me. There’s no-one but me doing whatever I have to, to make sure they survive.

She gently took the pillow from under Melanie’s head and placed it over her face. Whatever I have to, she thought.

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